Claim subordination is the opposite of alchemy.  In most bankruptcy cases, creditors might look for ways to improve their treatment.  Claim subordination in the bankruptcy code provides a mechanism to force a creditor to receive worse treatment (relative to other non-subordinated claims which is, admittedly, not that great of treatment).

alchemy_lab

In bankruptcy, there are a

Over the last few weeks, I’ve commented on the new version of the OCC’s Commercial Real Estate Lending Handbook (I give it a gentlemen’s C); and I listed a few legal topics that deserve some guidance from the OCC. “Guidance” could even merely be a list of important topics (ending with a warning

Last month, the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency published the Commercial Real Estate Lending handbook (August 2013).  The 128 page handbook gives guidance to bank examiners and bankers on risks inherent in commercial real estate (“CRE”) lending.  It replaces a 95 page version published in 1995 (and revised in 1998). For this

In addition to the events that create “full recourse” liability (for the entire loan), bad boy liability also includes losses or damages incurred by the Lender based upon another list of “bad” events or triggers.  I’m sure that Jim Wallenstein will cover this at his presentation during the University of Texas Mortgage Lending Institute.

Several months ago, I mused that, due to the conservative trending of commercial real estate lending, the list of “bad boy” exceptions (to a “no personal liability” deal) could be viewed as a full recourse deal.  In other words, the exceptions to “no liability” could be so expansive or long, the practical reality equates to

Credit enhancement of commercial construction lending has a new, important twist to the traditional (full) payment and performance guaranty: the burn-off events go beyond valuation and debt service thresholds to also include many of the check list items utilized by permanent lenders.  The burn off has a new price.

  Finally, construction loans are bubbling

Once upon a time and in a very simple time,  construction lenders required full payment and performance guarantees, and only permanent lenders offered non-recourse financing (with “bad-boy” liability).  Now, even some construction lenders include a variation of non-recourse liability (with “bad-boy” events) in their structure.  And, the list of “triggers” or events that form the

People don’t “connect” their ownership (even a minority ownership) with their liability under bad-boy or non-recourse carveout agreements (whether in the form of an indemnity, or as a guaranty).   So, minority owners often transfer ownership without getting a release from bad boy liability .  It could be a costly mistake.

With deals under water and